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24.01.18

MPs invite views on joint inquiry into long-term funding to inform social care green paper

The Health Select Committee and the Communities and Local Government Committee have launched a joint inquiry today on the long-term funding of social care.

Once completed, the inquiry is expected to influence the outcome of the government’s much-anticipated social care green paper, now only likely to be released in summer this year.

The committees say they will be attempting to develop a plan for funding reforms which will “command broad consensus to allow progress in ensuring the long-term sustainability of both the health and care systems.”

The inquiry will stress the interdependence of both health and social care and will look to create reforms that can benefit both sides of the system.

It was announced in November last year that the government would be pushing back the promised green paper despite councils repeatedly calling for the issue of funding to be dealt with.

More recently, former housing minister Alok Sharma gave more information on the paper, which he said would take in plans to address the housing needs of older people and ensure that pressure was not put on other services.

The LGA has previously called the paper the “last chance” for government to deal with the problems within social care. And earlier this year, the Lords Committee put pressure on the government to set up an independent Office for Health and Care Sustainability to look into health and social care for the next 15 to 20 years.

Written submissions to the inquiry have been invited, with the consultation period ending on 7 March.

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Comments

Tim Sneller   25/01/2018 at 09:32

The reason that there is a shortage of Social Care, and massive bedblocking in the NHS, is that Local Authorities WILL NOT pay a sustainable rate for Social Care. The UKHCA has calculated that the minimum rate that should be paid by LA's is £18.01, and this rises to £23.02 in London. See https://www.ukhca.co.uk/pdfs/minimum_price_for_homecare_v5_1.pdf Any less than this means that care workers are either not trained properly, or do not receive the legal minimum rate of pay, which is the Living Wage. Some LA's, even in London, are paying under £15.00 per hour for contact time. If there is a substantial shortfall between the rate that is being paid, and the outgoing costs, no company can survive for very long.

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