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05.10.16

May pledges path towards ‘new centre ground’ of British politics

The new Conservative government wants to put itself and the country on the path towards “the new centre ground of British politics”, prime minister Theresa May is set to say today to delegates at the Tory party conference.

May will use her speech to push for a new approach that reflects the “good that government can do”, moving away from the way “a lot of politicians and commentators” talk about the public today – such as by finding their patriotism “distasteful” or their concerns about immigration “parochial”.

“It’s time to remember the good that government can do,” she will say.

“Time for a new approach that says while government does not have all the answers, government can and should be a force for good; that the state exists to provide what individual people, communities and markets cannot; and that we should employ the power of government for the good of the people.”

She is also expected to end her first party conference as prime minister by promising to deliver action on identifying injustices, finding solutions, and driving change.

“I want to set our party and our country on the path towards the new centre ground of British politics - built on the values of fairness and opportunity - where everyone plays by the same rules and where every single person, regardless of their background or that of their parents, is given the chance to be all they want to be,” May will say.

Anti-Labour digs

Similarly to other major speeches delivered throughout this week’s Conservative Party Conference, such as chancellor Philip Hammond’s, the prime minister will take the opportunity to take a dig at the “divided and divisive” Labour Party.

“The main lesson I take from their conference last week is that the Labour Party is not just divided, but divisive,” she will say.

“Determined to pit one against another. To pursue vendettas and settle scores. And to embrace the politics of pointless protest that doesn't unite people but pulls them further apart. So let's have no more of Labour's absurd belief that they have a monopoly on compassion.

“Let's put an end to their sanctimonious pretence of moral superiority. Let's make clear that they have given up the right to call themselves the party of the NHS, the party of the workers, the party of public servants.”

(Top image c. Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)

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