12.09.17

Lifting of pay cap for police officers ‘will satisfy no one’

The government has today confirmed that it will lift the 1% public sector pay cap for rank and file police officers in 2017-2018.

It will also lift the pay cap for the wider public sector over the next year.

Police officers will be given a pay award worth a total of 2% to each officer in 2017 and 2018. The award will consist of a 1% increase to base pay for all ranks, as well as an additional one-off non-consolidated payment to officers at federated and superintending ranks.

The Cabinet Office said that the award strikes “a fair balance for police forces, officers and taxpayers” and that it believed the policy was affordable within the current police funding settlement.

“The tireless work and contribution of police officers in responding to some of the most challenging situations our country has faced for a very long time has been extraordinary,” said home secretary Amber Rudd.

“This award strikes a fair balance for police forces, officers and taxpayers. We want to reward and attract the very best police officers within the resources we have, whilst making the right decisions for the economy overall.”

This will now bring wages for officers to starting salaries of between £19,971 (no qualifications) and £23,124 for constables, rising to £38,382 within seven years of joining.

But the announcement will be unlikely to appease many people. A major union has argued that the change will be difficult to pay for without new government funding.

Dave Penman, general secretary of the FDA union for senior managers and professionals in public service, stated: “Today's announcement on public sector pay will ultimately satisfy no one.

“Clearly timed to coincide with the TUC conference and speech by the Leader of the Opposition, it also came on the day when the RPI measure of inflation rose to 3.9%. So the government finally unlocks the pay cap, but does so without understanding how such a mealy-mouthed attempt will play with public servants or their representatives.”

Penman also added that with no additional funding, this change will simply heap further pressure on already overstretched departments to make more cuts.

“After seven years of pay restraint, we need the government to recognise the impact this policy has had on those who have delivered billions in efficiencies whilst maintaining vital services,” he explained. 

“Today's announcement is not a pay strategy for the public sector, it's a political reaction to events - and not a very good one at that.”

Top Image: Joe Giddens, PA Wire 

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Comments

Geoff Price   14/09/2017 at 13:06

What about those employed in local Town and Parish Councils who are not being allowed to join the Local Government Pension Scheme (despite being considered as part of the Local Governance set-up). They are and being offered the Legal Minimum Pension contribution of 1% in the first year rising to 3% in year 3 thereafter in the NEST scheme. Even more worrying is that some of these councils are in labour control. They consider this as an Austerity measure. More like making local parish and town council staff work until they die before the get a decent pension.

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