Poverty and Inequality

06.04.17

DCLG to consult councils on spending model for Troubled Families scheme

The government will review the spending model of its current Troubled Families programme with local councils, the first annual report of the controversial scheme has revealed.

The programme was first introduced in 2012 and ran until 2015, costing an estimated £1bn to implement – including just under £500m from central government pots.

The current Troubled Families programme, which was rebooted in 2015, is now central to the government’s social reform programme and aims to work with the country’s most disadvantaged families to solve problems such as unemployment, debt and abuse, as well as mental and physical health problems.

In the report, which assesses the progress made by the programme since 2015, DCLG stated that it would be conducting a review of the programme’s payment by results model.

It also revealed that the government was aiming to work with up to 400,000 families by 2020, on top of the 185,000 who have reportedly seen positive benefits since 2015.

“Payment by results has provided a much-needed focus on real, tangible changes and outcomes being made in families rather than an offer of help and sympathy with little long lasting impact,” the report said.

“However, we need to be certain that it will provide the sharp focus we need on parental worklessness. We also need to be certain it will deliver long-term service reform after the programme ends in 2020.

“Over the coming months we will seek the views of local authorities delivering the Troubled Families Programme and the voluntary and community organisations whose role is also critical for future success.”

DCLG also explained that it would put an added focus on parental worklessness to tackle the adverse effects that growing up in a household with unemployed parents can have on a child’s future.

In his foreword to the report, communities secretary Sajid Javid argued that the current programme had learnt a lot from the 2012-15 scheme run by the previous government, but that it had made improvements to help a broader range of disadvantaged families.

“It is helping families with a much broader range of disadvantages and making sure that younger children are more likely to benefit from the whole family support on offer,” said Javid.

“This programme is also more transparent. Annual reports like this one will set out the programme’s progress and successes as well as where improvements might be needed.”

The first Troubled Families programme has since been heavily criticised by councils and central government after a review of its aims and eventual outcomes.

In its own review of the scheme, the government found that it had had no significant impact on reducing poverty and inequality overall in the UK.

The influential Public Accounts Committee also slammed the programme for misleading the public by claiming it had been successful, and also for prioritising ‘tick in a box’ results over delivering a meaningful impact for families.

Have you got a story to tell? Would you like to become a PSE columnist? If so, click here.

Comments

There are no comments. Why not be the first?

Add your comment

 

public sector executive tv

more videos >

latest public sector news

Core Cities leaders press for domestic post-Brexit agenda after meeting with Barnier

23/02/2018Core Cities leaders press for domestic post-Brexit agenda after meeting with Barnier

Leaders and mayors representing Core Cities UK have met with the EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier this week. The Brussels meeting saw leaders ... more >
DHSC seeks views on addressing care workforce challenges

23/02/2018DHSC seeks views on addressing care workforce challenges

A consultation focusing on the adult social care workforce has been launched by the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), in partnership wit... more >
An unsettling finance settlement?

23/02/2018An unsettling finance settlement?

Piali Das Gupta, head of policy at Solace, looks over the final local government finance settlement and argues that it does not do enough to supp... more >

editor's comment

25/10/2017Take a moment to celebrate

Devolution, restructuring and widespread service reform: from a journalist’s perspective, it’s never been a more exciting time to report on the public sector. That’s why I could not be more thrilled to be taking over the reins at PSE at this key juncture. There could not be a feature that more perfectly encapsulates this... read more >

last word

The importance of openness after Grenfell

The importance of openness after Grenfell

Following the recent Grenfell Tower tragedy, Lord Porter, chairman of the LGA, argues that if the public are going to have faith in the safety testing process then everything must be out in the o... more > more last word articles >
Academies mean councils struggling to take integrated approach to education

23/02/2018Academies mean councils struggling to take integrated approach to education

Councils are struggling to take an integrated approach to education in areas where high numbers of secondary schools are academies, a report by the National Audit Office (NAO) has revealed. The ... more >
Core Cities leaders press for domestic post-Brexit agenda after meeting with Barnier

23/02/2018Core Cities leaders press for domestic post-Brexit agenda after meeting with Barnier

Leaders and mayors representing Core Cities UK have met with the EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier this week. The Brussels meeting saw leaders of the 10 largest urban areas outside London discu... more >

the raven's daily blog

Whole of government must act together to fulfil the ambition of the Industrial Strategy

11/12/2017Whole of government must act together to fulfil the ambition of the Industrial Strategy

Jen Rae, head of innovation policy at Nesta, says the aims in the government’s new Industrial Strategy are ambitious, but will require a shift in policymaking in order to be realised in full. Last Monday saw the long-awaited launch of the UK’s new Industrial Strategy, the government’s plan for prosperity and growth in a ... more >
read more blog posts from 'the raven' >

comment

An unsettling finance settlement?

23/02/2018An unsettling finance settlement?

Piali Das Gupta, head of policy at Solace, looks over the final local government finance settlement and argues that it does not do enough to supp... more >
Finance settlement: a golden opportunity

23/02/2018Finance settlement: a golden opportunity

The local government finance settlement must enable counties to continue to be the engines of the English economy by providing a fairer funding a... more >
Data protection by design

23/02/2018Data protection by design

Nigel Houlden, head of technology policy at the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), looks at how organisations can win back public tru... more >
Citizen-centric cities for a better tomorrow

22/02/2018Citizen-centric cities for a better tomorrow

Mark Collin, group director of Ventures at ThoughtWorks, discusses how governments can learn from a bottom-up, citizen-focused approach to d... more >

interviews

BIM: Digitising the public sector

19/02/2018BIM: Digitising the public sector

PSE’s Josh Mines talks to Stephen Crompton, CTO at GroupBC, and Stuart Bell, the company’s sales and marketing director, about how Bu... more >
Duncan Selbie: The energy of devolution

19/02/2018Duncan Selbie: The energy of devolution

The NHS plays a part in keeping the country well – but when it comes to places and their people, local government has a major role to fulfi... more >
Are we taking a risk on education?

14/12/2017Are we taking a risk on education?

Adrian Prandle, director of economic strategy and negotiations at the National Education Union (NEU), questions the stark lack of announcements a... more >
A fantastic opportunity awaits you

11/12/2017A fantastic opportunity awaits you

Eight months on from the government’s announcement of major training reforms, Anne Milton, minister for apprenticeships and skills at the D... more >

public sector focus

View all News